About the Community Risk Register

How is it produced?

The Community Risk Register is produced by a multi-agency Risk Assessment Working Group (RAWG), working within the Civil Contingencies framework. Development and maintenance of the Risk Register is overseen by the Staffordshire Civil Contingencies Unit (CCU), based at Beaconside in Stafford.  Regular assessments of the hazards and risks are regularly undertaken by the CCU, backed up by the multi-agency RAWG meeting on a quarterly basis. The Community Risk Register prioritises risks in order to identify current Staffordshire risk priorities.

 

A summary of the very high and high risks in the Community Risk Register can be accessed via the link (list of risks by rating) in the left hand column. The below explains how potential nationally identified risks / hazards have been researched, assessed, scored and prioritised. 
Based on this assessment process appropriate considerations have be made and actions taken to control and mitigate the impacts of these hazards and risks on
the population of Staffordshire.

The Community Risk Register can be accessed via the links in the left hand column sorted by level of risk, thus enabling the reader to quickly understand the risks in Staffordshire.  The document explains how potential nationally identified risks / hazards have been researched, assessed, scored and prioritised.  Based on this assessment process appropriate considerations have be made and actions taken to control and mitigate the impacts of these hazards and risks on the population of Staffordshire.

What is the risk rating process?

The risk rating process works as follows:

a. An assessment of the likelihood of an event occurring in Staffordshire over the next five years is given a score of one to five; one being the lowest (negligible) and five being the highest (probable).

b. The impact of an event occurring in the areas is mapped against the impact on the health, social, economic and environmental aspects of our community. The scoring values are also one to five, with one being the lowest (insignificant) and five the highest (catastrophic). 

Background information to the Process.

Definitions

Hazard - an accidental or naturally occurring event or situation with the potential to cause physical (or psychological) harm to members of the community (including loss of life), damage or losses to property and/or disruption to the environment or to structures (economic, social, or political) upon which the community's way of life depends.

Threat - the deliberate / malicious intent to cause loss of life or create adverse consequences to human welfare, the environment or security of a place or the UK. (This includes causing disruption.)

Risk - measures the significance of potential emergencies, in terms of likelihood and impact in the context of the CCA.

Impact -measures the consequence of the event.

Likelihood - measures the probability and frequency of the event occurring in the next 5 years. The table below sets out the definitions of each level of risk and enables the reader to understand how the likelihood scoring has been assessed.

 

 

Score

Descriptor

Stated Chance in five years

Likelihood

1

Low

Between 1 in 20,000 and 1 in 2000

Negligible

2

Medium-low

Between 1 in 2000 and 1 in 200

Unlikely

3

Medium

Between 1 in 200 and 1 in 20

Possible

4

Medium-high

Between 1 in 20 and 1 in 2

Likely

5

High

1 in 2 or more

Probable

 

 

How has the Community Risk Register been compiled?

Using the 6 stage process as follows:

1. Contextualisation

This involves defining the nature and scope of the risk and agreeing how the risk management process will be undertaken.

2. Identify hazards & threats

  • Physical-mechanical failings of structures.
  • Environmental / natural-severe weather.
  • Organisational / infrastructure - staff illness or loss of building.
  • Social / community-loss of homes.
  • Health (human & animal) -pandemics, foot & mouth.
  • Technological-dam collapse, system failures.

3. Risk analysis

Assessing the likelihood of hazards occurring within the next five years, which is the timescale adopted nationally. This is done by considering the description of an outcome of an incident before assessing how likely an occurrence would be within this timescale.  These assessments have been carried out by a small team of professions from the Police, Fire and Rescue Service, Environment Agency, Local Authorities, NHS and Civil Contingencies Unit in Staffordshire based on their experience and knowledge.

4. Risk evaluation

  • Identify hazards & threats.
  • Analyse the risks (evaluate them).
  • Consider Historical data, national and regional risk assessments, statistical information, experience, enquiry reports and lessons learned.

 

Risks are scored according to the following table:  

 Risk-Matrix-Blank

  

View the Risk Matrix populated with the Staffordshire Risks.

5. Risk treatment

  • Recognise/ develop plans for unacceptable risks.
  • Test individual and multi agency plans and capabilities.

6. Monitoring and reviewing

In Staffordshire, the Community Risk Register is reviewed regularly and formally at least once every year. This ongoing process makes the Community Risk Register a living document and an ongoing project.

Malicious Threats

In line with national guidance, members of the Staffordshire Resilience Forum do not assess risks locally but consider the national assessments.  Using this information we look at possible consequences of such attacks and we ensure that our existing plans and protocols are still fit for purpose.  The planning that takes place in our area is based on potential consequences such as planning for large numbers of casualties, regardless of whether they came about by accident or as a result of a malicious act.

Below are edited extracts from the National Risk Register (NRR) (see link here to view the full document) which set out potential malicious threats that apply not just to Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent but to the whole of the UK.

Terrorist attacks on crowded places

While there have been attacks against well-protected targets around the world, crowded places remain an attractive target for a terrorist attack.  Crowded places by their nature are easily accessible and offer the prospect for an impact beyond the loss of life alone.  Attacks are often carried out without warning.

Consequences may include:

  • Casualties and fatalities
  • Damage to property and infrastructure within the affected area, potentially leading to a need for evacuation or temporary housing for those affected
  • Potential for wider economic damage

Terrorist attacks on infrastructure

The national infrastructure comprises those facilities, systems, sites, networks and essential workers necessary for the functioning of the country and the delivery of the essential services upon which daily life in the UK depends.  These fundamental services, such as electricity and water supply, ensure that the country continues to function socially and economically.

Many of the impacts and consequences which could result from industrial accidents, technical failure or severe weather could also result from a terrorist attack on infrastructure.  The risk and impact vary according to the nature of the specific infrastructure asset attacked.

Consequences may include:

  • Casualties and fatalities
  • Damage to property and infrastructure within the affected area, potentially leading to a need for evacuation or temporary housing for those affected
  • Loss of/interruption to supply of essential goods and services and disruption to transport networks
  • Depending on the nature of the incident, contamination and environmental damage.

Terrorist attacks on transport systems

Of the different malicious attacks, conventional terrorist attacks on land and air-based transport systems are judged to be some of the more likely to occur, although the likelihood of them affecting any one individual is still extremely low.

Consequences may include:

  • Casualties and fatalities
  • Damage to property and infrastructure within the affected area, potentially leading to a need for evacuation or temporary housing for those affected
  • Loss of/interruption to essential goods and services and disruption to transport

Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear (CBRN)

The likelihood of terrorists successfully undertaking an attack against a nuclear or chemical facility or obtaining chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) material remains low but not negligible.  The UK Government is prioritising efforts to stop terrorists gaining the expertise and the material to deliver such attacks.  But if terrorist attacks were successful, their potential impact on the UK would be severe and significantly greater than a conventional attack.

Consequences may include:

  • Casualties and fatalities who may be contaminated
  • Damage to property and infrastructure within the affected area, potentially leading to a need for evacuation or temporary housing for those affected
  • Loss of/interruption to supply of essential goods and services and disruption to transport networks

Depending on the nature of the incident, contamination (of people, buildings, infrastructure, food and/or the environment) and environmental damage which may be difficult to clean up.

Cyber security

A growing number of adversaries are looking to use cyber space to steal, compromise or destroy critical data.  The scale of our dependence means that our prosperity, our key infrastructure, our places of work and our homes can all be affected.  Vulnerabilities can take time to identify, leaving vast numbers of systems open to exploitation to be used in attacking other systems and networks remotely.

  • Consequences may include:
  • Loss/compromise of personal or corporate information
  • Damage to business, the economy and reputation
  • Loss of/interruption to supply of essential goods and services and communications network